Nihon de Hajimete: Part 2, Taishoen and Daijuen

Taishoen
The next Leg of the trip saw us visiting Urushibata San and Taishoen. There are a mad amount of awesome shohin, Chuhin, and Omono bonsai at Taishoen, and it’s definitely a nursery not to be missed!

20130812-184140.jpg

20130812-184215.jpg

20130812-184242.jpg

20130812-184302.jpg

20130812-184425.jpg

20130812-184443.jpg
A few large Shinpaku bonsai…

20130812-184542.jpg

20130812-184605.jpg

20130812-184631.jpg
Massive pines!

20130812-184803.jpg
Tosho

20130812-184932.jpg

20130812-184959.jpg

20130812-185033.jpg

20130812-185014.jpg
Kaede

20130812-185212.jpg
Killer cascade Shinpaku in development.

20130812-185309.jpg

20130812-185323.jpg
Ume!!!

20130812-185439.jpg
Shohin Tosho with some really impressive Ibo-jin.

20130812-185621.jpg
Broom style Keyaki.

20130812-185726.jpg
Twisty shohin Shinpaku.
Daijuen
Next up, we met up with Mr. Ken Fujiwara, who prepared Matt’s Kaede thr appeared in Kokufu earlier this year. Mr. Fujiwara apprenticed at Daijuen, and was kind enough to take us on a tour of Daijuen, Shinpukuji Temple, and Aichien.
Daijuen had a large number of world class large pines, in addition to some impressive Tosho and maples.

20130812-190231.jpg

20130812-190122.jpg

20130812-190210.jpg
A few large Pines….

20130812-190459.jpg
Seas of pines.

20130812-190526.jpg
Still more seas of pines…

20130812-190545.jpg
Oceans of pines!

20130812-190606.jpg
Pines!!

20130812-190848.jpg
Broom style Keyaki.

20130812-190912.jpg
Killer base on a multi trunk Maple.

20130812-190942.jpg
Big root over rock Kaede.

20130812-190957.jpg
Big an well refined Tosho.

20130812-191301.jpg
Massive pine!

Up next: Fujiwara San shows us around to Shinpukuji Temple and Aichien.

About japanesepots

I've been collecting Japanese Bonsai pots for a few years, and feel that the famous, and some of the lesser known but great Japanese pot artists could do with a little more writing and exposure in English. Additionally, this blog will feature My own And others bonsai for discussion. The purpose of this blog is to further knowledge of Japanese pottery and Japanese style bonsai. If you have any questions about Japanese bonsai pottery, or would like to acquire pots by some of the potters presented in the blog, feel free to email me at gastrognome@aol.com
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Nihon de Hajimete: Part 2, Taishoen and Daijuen

  1. Alex says:

    Aaaaaand now I have to figure out how to fake my death so I can move to Japan without feeling guilty for abandoning my family. Thanks. . . .

  2. tmmason10 says:

    Thanks for sharing all these great photos! In the fifth photo under daijuen, is that shade cloth just draped on top of trees? Just curious if this is common practice in Japan.

    • japanesepots says:

      Hi Tom,
      Sure is. I’ve seen the technique before, and saw it a lot while I was there. On trident maples after cutback and defoliation, needle junipers after cutback, and a couple species that had been recently grafted.

  3. lepcon says:

    Wow! Your bonsai are all wonderful. Looking at them inspires me to career my hobby in growing bonsai plants. It’s been my hobby on creating my looks just like yours.
    Thank you very much for the inspiration. Good luck and keep on inspiring more.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s